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EOS Block Producers “crashed” presumably due to their poorly Configured Systems
Editorial Team

According to a recent report of cryptoglobe.com, EOS NEW YORK, a top EOS Blockchain Producer (BP) revealed that a number of block producers “crashed” after the network’s RAM usage “exceeded GB.” Per the BP, these either “did not configure their node to properly set it at 64 GB,” or only had 1 GB.

According to EOS New York, the block producers whose systems reportedly crashed were not following the guidelines outlined in their agreement. Therefore, the US-based organization implied they are at fault, although it is still confirming details.

The tweet caused confusion, and the users responded to it by asking what had happened to the cryptocurrency’s Blockchain. Despite the quick addressing of the matter, there was a great controversy and heavy critic at the EOS project.

However, EOS New York posted an updated status stating that “the network is live and did not experience any disruptions.”

According to the site report, research has shown that EOS may be more centralized than its enthusiasts would like to be, as the top 1.6 percent of holders own 90 percent of the cryptocurrency’s supply. Additionally, in the recent past, Block Producers have been ordered to freeze 27 accounts on the Blockchain, implying that one organization can have control over users’ money.

This pushed Dan Larimer, the architect of EOS propose a new constitution, which would remove most of the powers away from EOS Core Arbitration Forum (ECAF) which ordered the accounts to be frozen.

A large Bitcoin mining hardware manufacturer valued at $12 billion, well-known for its monopoly over the ASICs industry, Bitmain, recently qualified to become one of EOS network’s 21 Block producers. Bitmain controls two top BTC mining pools, and has shares in another one, ViaBTC, allowing it to potentially pull a 51 percent attack on the network, a move that the co-founder of Bitmain, Jihan Wu (Bitcoin Cash advocate) says would not make sense as it would hurt his organization’s finance. The company recently invested $50 million in Opera web browser’s IPO.